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Last week Donald Trump lamented that there weren't more guns at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando on the night of the massacre there.

"It's too bad that some of the young people that were killed over the weekend didn't have guns, you know, attached to their hips, frankly, and, you know, where bullets could have flown in the opposite direction," he told Boston talk radio host Howie Carr.

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"It would have been a much different deal. I mean, it sounded like there were no guns. They had a security guard. Other than that, there were no guns in the room. Had people been able to fire back, it would have been a much different outcome."

Trump expressed similar sentiments at a rally in Atlanta, where he suggested things would have turned out different if “some of those great people that were in that club that night had guns strapped to their waist or strapped to their ankle.”

Then, on Sunday, NRA executive vice president Wayne LaPierre responded on CBS, saying, "I don’t think you should have firearms where people are drinking." The NRA's top lobbyist made similar comments on ABC.

Trump was then forced to clarify his statement on Twitter.

Well, that settles it. Trump "obviously" was referring to security guards and employees when he talked about the "young people that were killed over the weekend" who "didn't have guns." And who hasn't seen a security guard with guns "strapped to their ankles"?

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To be fair, LaPierre's answer didn't make much sense, either. After all, the NRA has supported bills to allow people to carry firearms where people are drinking. Thanks to an NRA-backed bill from 2011, it is now perfectly legal for someone in Ohio to carry a concealed firearm into a bar. That person just can't be served a drink. (Did I mention that this is for concealed firearms?)

That's probably why the NRA also had to take to Twitter to back away from LaPierre's comments.

We eagerly await further clarification from Trump, letting us know that that's definitely what he meant to say as well.