Zach Dischner

For the second year in a row, Oregon saw the highest percentage of inbound moves among all U.S. states in 2014.

According to United Van Lines, 66 percent of the Beaver State's 4,121 overall moves were inbound. The Carolinas tied for second with 61 percent of its moves inbound, and Vermont came in third at 59 percent inbound. Here's the top 5:

  1. Oregon (4,121 moves, 66% inbound)
  2. South Carolina (4,088 moves, 61% inbound)
  3. North Carolina (10,624 moves, 61% inbound)
  4. Vermont (325 moves, 59% inbound)
  5. Florida (18,811 moves, 59% inbound)

California had the highest total inbound moves, at 14,908, representing 53.2 percent of its overall 2014 moves.

United counted nearly 256,000 moves in 2014.

Meanwhile, New Jersey finished No. 1 for most out-bound moves for the third year in a row. New York was second at 64 percent, followed by Illinois at 63 percent. Top 5 outbound:

  1. New Jersey (6,172 moves, 65% outbound)
  2. New York (9,766 moves, 64% outbound)
  3. Illinois (9,913 moves, 63% outbound)
  4. North Dakota (950 moves, 61% outbound)
  5. West Virginia (672 moves, 60% outbound)

Here's the full map. The Northeast continues to bleed residents:

"With economic stability growing nationally, the current migration patterns reflect longer-term trends of movement to the southern and western states, especially to those where housing costs are relatively lower, climates are more temperate and job growth has been at or above the national average, among other factors," said Michael Stoll, economist, professor and chair of the Department of Public Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Unique amenities such as outdoor recreation, arts and entertainment activities, and green space protection likely continue to propel Oregon to the top of the list for the second straight year."

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Related: The Washington DC-area is now the most millennial-soaked region in the country

Here's the full table, ranked by inbound-move percentage:

2014 UVL National Movers Study Final

Rob covers business, economics and the environment for Fusion. He previously worked at Business Insider. He grew up in Chicago.