BBC

The ass-kicking clones from Orphan Black are back for a third season tonight on BBC America. If you're not watching this fantastic show, you should.

At its core, it's about Sarah, a young woman on the run who discovers that she has a clone (that's not a spoiler, since you find out in the first 2 minutes of the first episode), but in two seasons it's grown to be so much more than that — truly strong female characters, interesting sci-fi aspects and an enticing narrative. It's about women and identity, but also about punching people in the face as hard as possible. Actress Tatiana Maslany plays all of the clone roles herself, and inhabits each character in such a dynamic way that you can easily forget you're watching the facial expressions, rage and anguish of one woman.

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Can't recall exactly where we left everyone last season? Here are 13 things you need to remember before you watch the season premiere.

1. Ep 1: Delphine double-crossed Cosima and gave Leekie her blood

Cosima is lovestruck and on the verge of death, so it sucks that her girlfriend is going behind her back to work for Dyad, the group the clones are investigating.

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2. We met Mark, the bright-eyed Prolethean nightmare that brought Helena to the weird ranch with Pastor Henrik

He took her eggs and inseminated her like one of his cows, but the really creepy thing is that he also put Helena's eggs into his daughter. Remember her, the girl whose mouth had been sewn shut as a punishment? Don't worry, Pastor Henrik died in an actual fire, as he should have.

3. Alison went to rehab

Between the clone thing, the way she murdered her neighbor Aynsley, and having her husband as her monitor, it all got to be a little too much.

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4. Mrs. S and The Birdwatchers kidnapped Kira to protect her
But then Sarah had to steal Kira back to prevent Mrs. S from taking her to London. Sara went to live in the woods with Kira and Felix for a while, but then decided to stay with Cal, a rich, nerdy, off-the-grid Mumford & Sons lookalike who happens to be Kira's dad.

5. We learned so much more about Project LEDA
The head scientists on the project were Rachel's parents! Mrs. S lied about her knowledge of the project! It turns out Rachel's dad is still alive, and he confirmed that Dr. Leekie and the other Neolutionists inside Dyad basically stole Rachel from him.

6. Helena escaped from the farm and murdered Daniel after he tortured Sarah a little

He was Rachel's right-hand man, but sorry — once Helena sees you hurt one of her seestruhs, you have to die. She also had a gnarly barroom brawl, which is her way of flirting.

7. Donnie blew Dr. Leekie's head off

Donnie didn't even know he was a monitor — he thought he was just working for Dr. Leekie. He tried to confront Leekie but fumbled the gun. After he and Alison buried Leekie under his garage, their romance was rekindled, so… silver lining?

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8. We met Tony, the transgender clone who didn't know he was a clone
He didn't stick around for long, but it was nice knowing you, Tony!

9. Kira's tooth might have enough genetic material to cure Cosima
It's still up in the air, but that kid's body parts might be magical.

10. Before he was killed via teabag, Duncan revealed that clones are designed to be barren
So Sarah is the anomaly, not the other clones! Before he died, Duncan gave Kira his Island of Dr. Moreau book, and the gene sequence information everyone thought was lost on floppy disks was written inside. Always go analog!

11. Paul was working as a secret agent with Mrs. S

More double-crossing!

12. Sarah used a fire extinguisher to shoot Rachel in the eye with a pencil

But only after she smashed all of the bone marrow Kira had donated.

13. Project LEDA has met its match, and it's the boy clones of Project CASTOR
Dyad heavy Marian Bowles takes Sarah to topside, and we find out that Mark is a clone!

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Danielle Henderson is a lapsed academic, heavy metal karaoke machine, and culture editor at Fusion. She enjoys thinking about how race, gender, and sexuality shape our cultural narratives, but not in a boring way.