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When readers finished the last word of the last Harry Potter book, it was easy to assume that they were saying goodbye for good to the world that J.K. Rowling had created. Well, that turned out to be extremely not the case. Ever since Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the Rowling factory has been churning out Potter spinoffs and sequels and filling in an ever-increasing amount of blanks about her magical universe.

On Friday, Rowling continued this trend by revealing new details about some of the magical schools that exist around the world. Keen Potter readers will recall the scene in the fourth book, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, when, during the Quidditch World Cup, Harry and company realized that England was not the only place on the globe that produced wizards. (And yes, we may have outed ourselves as Potter nerds just now.) Writing on her Pottermore website, Rowling elaborated on some of these other prestigious educational centers.

Here's part of her description of Uagadou, an African school:

Although Africa has a number of smaller wizarding schools (for advice on locating these, see introductory paragraph), there is only one that has stood the test of time (at least a thousand years) and achieved an enviable international reputation: Uagadou. The largest of all wizarding schools, it welcomes students from all over the enormous continent. The only address ever given is 'Mountains of the Moon'; visitors speak of a stunning edifice carved out of the mountainside and shrouded in mist, so that it sometimes appears simply to float in mid-air. Much (some would say all) magic originated in Africa, and Uagadou graduates are especially well versed in Astronomy, Alchemy and Self-Transfiguration.

On Saturday, Rowling signaled that there's more where that came from.