AP

Those who have lived in or visited Mexico City know it's one of the world's most wondrous capitals— a slowly sinking urban jungle where all types of bizarre records are broken.

Now Mexico City is adding to its mystique by launching a contest to find its own 7 Wonders of the world, and it's asking young Mexicans to help determine its top marvels.

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Mexican youths can vote online to choose their favorite sites from a list that includes everything from the city’s emblematic Angel of Independence monument, to the 100,000-seat Azteca Stadium, which hosted two World Cup finals.

Voters will also be able to select the best of Mexico City’s so-called Barrios Mágicos or “Magical Neighborhoods” and name the best theme parks. The results will be announced on Dec. 10.

The 7 Wonders initiative is the brainchild of Mexico City’s local government. It was created to commemorate Universal Children’s Day, which takes place each year on Nov. 20. The project drew its inspiration from the seven wonders of the world list, which includes Mexico’s Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza.

Here are some of the candidates competing to become a Mexico City wonder:

BUILDINGS

Estadio Azteca was the first stadium to host two world cup finals. It was here where Argentine soccer star Diego Maradona scored his 'hand of God' goal against England in 1986.
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The Bellas Artes Palace is home to the murals of legendary Mexican artists Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros. Mexico's most brilliant artists exhibit and perform within these walls.
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The Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral rests on top of an ancient pyramid. The church was built after the Spaniards conquered the Aztecs and serves both as a painful and proud memento of the country's Catholic heritage.
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MONUMENTS

The Angel of Independence is the go to spot to celebrate soccer victories or protest the latest political scandal.
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Legend has it that El Arbol de la Noche Triste or 'The Tree of the Sad Night' is where Spanish Conquistador Hernan Cortes cried when he was initially defeated by the Aztec army.
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Mexico's Monument to the Revolution is a triumph arch that was never finished. Today it serves as a museum and mausoleum for the fallen heroes of the Mexican revolution.
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PARKS

The Chapultepec Forest is Mexico's very own Central Park. It's often referred to as the 'lungs' of Mexico City and is home to a castle and several museums.
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Xochimilco is all about lake canals and floating trajineras (colorful rafts where you drink, eat and listen to some good old mariachi music). The lake is also home to Mexico's magical Axolotl creature.
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Ajusco is a national park where visitors can do all sorts of outdoor activities. Its snow covered mountains are a beautiful sight that contrasts with that of modern skyscrapers.
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MUSEUMS

Artist Frida Khalo's blue house is one of the most popular attractions for foreigners. Plenty of drama took place within its walls before the house was turned into a museum (such as when husband Diego Rivera found out Khalo was having an affair with Soviet revolutionary Leon Trotsky).
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The Children's Museum is perhaps the most fun of all the competing wonders. Inside you'll find a lab to create giant bubbles, a bed of nails and all sorts of objects you can interact with. Touching is not prohibited, it's encouraged.
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The Templo Mayor Museum is in fact an ancient temple where some of the country's most precious Aztec archeology is on display.
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MAGICAL NEIGHBORHOODS

The San Angel neighborhood is characterized by its big houses with traditional facades. The neighborhood has an old school vibe that transports you back in time.
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Calle Madero is one of the busiest avenues. It leads to the city's main square known as the Zocalo. The street is named after Franciso I. Madero, best known in history books for ending the dictatorship of President Porfirio Diaz and laying some of the early foundations of Mexican democracy.
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Plaza de las Tres Culturas or "The plaza of three cultures" is literally a place where the ruins of three different pre-hispanic cultures come together. But the plaza is mostly remembered for the student massacre that took place there in 1968.
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THEME PARKS

Six Flags Mexico is home to some scary rollercoasters such as Batman The Ride and Medusa. This American franchise is not exactly a Mexican landmark, but it has become a staple theme park for many who grew up in Mexico City.
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At la Granja kids can interact with all sorts of farm animals. Urban residents get a feel for country life and get to touch some cute bunnies.
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This old school fair has one of the scariest haunted houses in the world. This is one of the best places for teenagers to go out on a date.
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