Getty Images/David McNew

A horrible incidence of gun violence in Missouri last night could further inflame a gun-control debate already raging in the state.

The gunman, among the eight people killed, reportedly went door to door killing people in a small neighborhood 60 miles from the Arkansas border.

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Just this week, a court heard arguments from a group challenging a recently approved amendment to the Missouri constitution expanding gun rights.

St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson has called on Missouri’s top court to throw out Amendment 5, which broadened the right to bear arms to include ammunition and other gun accessories, and struck down an existing passage in the state constitution that said the right to bear arms “does not justify carrying concealed weapons.”

Dotson, along with non-profit group Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, contend voters could not understand the full spirit of the amendment when it was placed on last year’s ballot.

Here’s what it looked like on the ballot (via Ballotopedia):

Ballotopedia

"Yes, they voted overwhelmingly [in favor] because they were deceived, just like every day people buy products online that they think are good products, get them back to the house, and you open them up and it's crap," said Chuck Hatfield, a lawyer representing both Dotson and the Moms group, according to KWMU. "That's why we have consumer fraud laws in this state, and that's why we have a right to review what was on the ballot."

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Hatfield argues the amendment could undo gun-control laws in Missouri, the station said, noting two felons charged with owning firearms are already using Amendment 5 to challenge their lifetime ban on gun ownership. It could also potentially lead to allowing sports fans to carry guns to games.

Supporters of the amendment argue Hatfield has not produced any evidence that voters were misled, and that the time his clients could legally challenge the amendment has passed.

A ruling has yet to be issued.

Rob covers business, economics and the environment for Fusion. He previously worked at Business Insider. He grew up in Chicago.