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Oxford Dictionaries announced on Wednesday the addition of several new, slangy words to its online dictionary. The Oxford English Dictionary's chill counterpart shared the new words in a blog post, explaining:

NBD, but are you ready to fangirl over our dictionary update? Abso-bloody-lutely. We’ve got some awesomesauce new words – no, rly – that will inform and entertain whether you’re hangry or it’s already wine o’clock. Mic drop.

Some of the words in the quarterly update are both not words and not so new, like "manic pixie dream girl," a noun, defined as: "(Especially in film) a type of female character depicted as vivacious and appealingly quirky, whose main purpose within the narrative is to inspire a greater appreciation for life in a male protagonist."

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Others, like "Social Justice Warrior," or SJW, require context beyond what context clues would provide — in this case, the explanation that SJW is used a derogatory term.

Here are some other words included in this update, plus their definitions and origins, taken from the Oxford Dictionaries website:

Bruh (noun) A male friend (often used as a form of address)

Origin: Early 20th century (as an informal title before a man's name): perhaps originally representing an African-American pronunciation of brother; compare brer, brah.

Hangry (adjective) Bad-tempered or irritable as a result of hunger

Origin: Early 21st century: blend of hungry and angry.

Redditor (noun) A registered user of the website Reddit

Origin: Early 21st century: from the proprietary name of the website Reddit, on the pattern of editor.

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Snackable (adjective) (Of food) suitable to be eaten as a snack, or (Of online content) designed to be read, viewed, or otherwise engaged with briefly and easily:

Butt dial (verb) Inadvertently call (someone) on a mobile phone in one’s rear trouser pocket, as a result of pressure being accidentally applied to a button or buttons on the phone.

(noun) An inadvertent call made on a mobile phone in one’s rear trouser pocket, as a result of pressure being accidentally applied to a button or buttons on the phone.

Mx (noun) A title used before a person’s surname or full name by those who wish to avoid specifying their gender or by those who prefer not to identify themselves as male or female.

Origin: 1970s: apparently from M (as in Mr, Mrs, Ms, etc.) + X1(probably denoting an unknown or variable factor or quantity).


In June of this year, the Oxford English Dictionary also added a number of new words, like FLOTUS, freegan and fap fap fap.

Danielle Wiener-Bronner is a news reporter.