(AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

May Day typically marks a day of protest for labor rights groups across the world (though not in the U.S., where our own separate Labor Day was created to prevent the American working class from feeling too much solidarity with their international comrades.)

But this is 2017 and Donald Trump is president, which means that Americans took to the streets both to honor May Day and to stand in solidarity with the immigrant communities that Trump has been targeting since he took power.

Here are some scenes from the nationwide protests.

Sacramento

Protesters marched up the Capitol Mall to support immigrants and a $15 minimum wage.


Los Angeles

In Southern California, a huge throng of demonstrators rallied in downtown LA.



Washington D.C.

Groups from all over the country converged on the nation’s capital.



Atlanta

Atlanta’s City Hall became the rallying point for demonstrators, who chanted “Sí se puede” at officials. They were pushing for officials not to arrest immigrants without a warrant.



Boston

At the University Of Massachusetts Boston, the Cosecha Movement—an organization devoted to fighting to protect undocumented immigrants—helped gather a crowd.


Philadelphia

Protesters rallied together for #BlackBrownSolidarity.


Chicago

Intersectionality was a theme in Chicago as well, with Black Lives Matter speakers being featured as part of the May Day march.



Austin

Protesters gathered not only to express support for immigrants, but also to stage a sit-in at Gov. Greg Abbott’s office to oppose Texas’ SB4 bill, which would ban sanctuary cities in the state.


Bay Area

Asians for Black Lives demonstrated outside the Alameda County administrative building.

And protesters blocked streets around the ICE office in San Francisco, claiming the agency had been used them to deport immigrants.




New York

Demonstrators also gathered across New York City.



Milwaukee

Protesters stood in solidarity with immigrants and labor groups, and also targeted Sheriff David Clarke, who has loudly supported using his police officers as de-facto immigration agents.