AP

President @realDonaldTrump’s track record of pissing off close U.S. allies is building, and the story about his confusing statement on Sweden during a weekend campaign speech in Florida isn’t going gently into that good night.

On Sunday night, the Swedish government, apparently not satisfied with Trump’s attempt at clarifying his statement via Twitter, offered to help educate the U.S. administration on the facts of that Scandinavian country, its crime rate, and its humanitarian policy on broadly accepting refugees.

During a campaign speech Saturday in Melbourne, FL, Trump raised eyebrows by referring to refugees and something that apparently had happened “last night in Sweden.” The president followed the comment by referring to terrorist attacks in other European countries.

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After hours of confusion and ridicule on social media, Trump attempted to clarify his gaffe not by, oh I don’t know, calling Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven to apologize, but tweeting that he was referring to a Fox News program he had seen the previous night featuring a right-wing documentary filmmaker discussing refugees and crime in Sweden.

According to NBC, a spokesperson from the Swedish Embassy in Washington couldn’t determine if Trump’s follow-up tweet served as an official response from the U.S. government following a Swedish request for clarification, raising further questions about the role of Trump’s Twitter account in U.S. diplomacy.

“We have asked State Department if President Trump’s tweet is their official answer to our question earlier today. We are still awaiting an answer on that,” the spokesperson told NBC.

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According to that report, in 2015, Sweden received between 160,000-190,000 asylum seekers, the most per capita in the European Union.

According to NBC:

On Sunday, in response to Trump, a popular Swedish tabloid described the biggest, most violent news stories that it could find from Friday: A man set himself on fire in Stockholm, an 83-year-old singer suffered technical difficulties during rehearsal for a big music competition, a man died in the hospital after a work-related accident, an avalanche warning was issued in northern parts of the country and Stockholm police engaged in a high-speed pursuit of a drunk driver.

The tabloid also noted another incident: A photo of a moose bull attempting to get frisky with a wooden moose lawn ornament had gone viral.

Sweden's former Prime Minister Carl Bildt continued his Twitter war with Trump, by actually resorting to facts:

On Monday morning, Trump, apparently fed up with everyone questioning his actions, and confusing himself with "the public," fired off yet another tweet about FAKE NEWS: