CNN screen capture

On Tuesday evening, Texas Senator  Ted Cruz went on CNN to discuss President Donald Trump's just-announced nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court.

There, the wildly unpopular, extremely punchable-looking Cruz took the opportunity to slam his Democratic colleagues for their (astonishingly half-hearted) efforts to block the President's various cabinet nominees.

Sen. Ted Cruz: "The Democrats are engaged right now in unprecedented partisan obstruction" https://t.co/UYpqI3w42L https://t.co/rNBruSGDF9

— CNN (@CNN) February 1, 2017

"There is no doubt that the Democrats are engaged right now in unprecedented partisan obstruction," Cruz explained to White House reporter Jim Acosta, who deserved an Emmy award for keeping a straight face at the Texas Republican's insanely selective memory. Because, of course, when it comes to unprecedented partisan obstruction, Ted Cruz is second to none.

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Consider, for example, when Cruz help prompt a complete shut down of the federal government over President Obama's just-passed Affordable Care Act—a political stunt which saw the freshman senator stand in front of the United States Senate and read Dr. Seuss's Green Eggs and Ham.

He also threatened a second government shut down over… internet domain names. Because, hey, that's as good a hill as any to die on, right?

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Or, perhaps slightly more germane to the debate brewing over Gorsuch's nomination, there was the time Cruz suggested that Republicans could simply block any and all Democratic Supreme Court nominees for an indefinite period of time. (And the time that the Republicans actually blocked the Supreme Court nomination of Merrick Garland.)

Or, for those who prefer cold hard numbers, there's the fact that Ted Cruz was ranked the most partisan Republican in the Senate by The Lugar Center and Georgetown University's McCourt School of Public Policy earlier this year.

So, yes, when it comes to understanding partisan obstructionism, Sen. Cruz is something of an expert.

But "unprecedented"? Ted, think again.