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Among other things, Donald Trump has promised to stop China from "raping" the U.S. if elected.

"We're like the piggy bank that's being robbed," he said this week. "We have the cards. We have a lot of power with China."

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Now that Trump is the presumptive GOP nominee, China is debating what this all means.

In the course of doing so, they've come up with an amazing nickname for the candidate:

Breaking bed.

XPatNation.com recently explained:

In China’s social media, Trump is transliterated into “Chuan-pu” or “Tang-Chuang-Po,” both of which sound funny and disrespectful in Mandarin. The former literally means “Sichuan-style Mandarin” and the latter “Donald Breaking Bed.” Chinese internet users gave Trump these nicknames mostly because they believed that Trump was just a joke and had absolutely no chance of getting elected.

This week, the Global Times, the English language website run by the People's Daily, asked eight Chinese scholars to comment on how a Trump victory would affect the country's relationship with the U.S.

Most doubt he can win, and dismiss his anti-China rhetoric as electioneering.

"Many of Trump's speeches against China are mere claptrap," said Zhao Minghao, a research fellow at the Charhar Institute and an adjunct fellow at the Chongyang Institute for Financial Studies. "Trump said the U.S. is 'going to lose $500 billion in terms of trade' to China. The figure isn't correct. The U.S. trade deficit last year was $366 billion with China…If the U.S. uses radical trade polices against China, this will not only hurt the interests of U.S. consumers and enterprises, but also impair the whole global trade system."

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Jia Qingguo, the dean of the School of International Studies at Peking University, said he does not view Trump as being able to win over "mainstream" voters. But if he does manage to win, the Chinese could warm to him.

"It seems that Chinese citizens prefer Trump to Clinton," he said. "This is understandable as the latter has criticized China a number of times over the cyber security, human rights and so forth. Trump, on the other hand, is a mystery to Chinese. Although he has expressed dissatisfaction with the current U.S. China policies, he looks forward to strengthening ties with China as well."

Rob covers business, economics and the environment for Fusion. He previously worked at Business Insider. He grew up in Chicago.