CNN

Ricardo Esponda's family has been making novelty Halloween masks for three generations now in Morelos, a state in central Mexico.

While business had always been steady, Esponda's company started seeing sharp spikes in orders last fall as the American presidential debates got into full swing. Demand for Donald Trump masks was increasing with every jump in Trump's media profile, and before long the mask became one of Esponda's best sellers.

The newfound interest in Trump's latex likeness prompted Esponda to introduce a "deluxe" model (retail price: $23) that swapped out a single mass of colored plastic for thin, individually-threaded wisps of hair.

"Some of our customers asked for it," Esponda told CNN. "It's got to have hair."

Dozens of Mexican women are employed in both of Esponda's mask-making factories where they meticulously cast likenesses of other traditional Halloween ghouls. Even with the high demand for the Trump mask, it has yet to outsell Esponda's most popular: El Chapo.