Getty Images

Vinyl has been making a comeback. Not only does it sound good, there's something beautiful about the physical process—removing an album from its sleeve, then from its protective white snuggie, and setting it onto a turntable.

But modern day record lovers have nothing on these old-school music fans, who manage to make listening to music look unbelievably relaxing and enjoyable. These photos, taken from 1929-1976, show the music consumption experience from the record's true heyday:

circa 1929: Uncaged parrots perch beside a gramophone. (Photo by Central Press/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Who knew that parrots loved to listen to music out of gramophones in 1929? And also do not fly away if just left outside perched near some tunes? Maybe this man is a conductor of parrots?

May 1929: Holidaymakers listening to music at teatime outside their tent on the Chiltern Hills in southern England. (Photo by Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)
Getty Images

This is actually a scene lifted directly from my dreams, in which I feed my goat a small cup of milk at tea time and listen to something on the music player, all while wearing what looks to be a really comfy cotton slip dress.

Advertisement

circa 1930: Dame Clara Butt (1872 - 1936) operating a communications radio with her dog, they are both wearing headphones. (Photo by Sasha/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Dogs love music too.

circa 1930: Methodist Pastor Kamal Chunchie with his assistants in London's dockland where he is starting a 'clinic' to try and cure and stamp out the opium menace. (Photo by Henry Guttmann/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Advertisement

The man holding this gramophone looks happier than anyone has ever looked, but his happiness has a cost. The man with the paper is getting the full force of these tunes.

circa 1935: Passengers listening to a radio on board an airplane. (Photo by Fox Photos/Getty Images)
Getty Images

If you're going to listen to music on an airplane, make sure you bring headphones for all your fellow passengers.

Advertisement

English conductor and impresario Sir Thomas Beecham (1879 - 1961) with a pair of turntables and some vinyl. Original Publication: People Disc - HP0264 (Photo by Erich Auerbach/Getty Images)
Getty Images

This man is not a DJ. He is a conductor. I do not know why he needs so many turntables at once.

Actress Margaret O'Brien listening to a tune played by 'The Thing', an exhibit at the South Bank Exhibition Telekinema, Royal Festival Hall, London, August 30th 1951. (Photo by J. Wilds/Keystone/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Advertisement

Who doesn't love to lean on a really large music box?

1st September 1951: A teacher at Lewisham junior school, London, which has been rebuilt after being destroyed in the Blitz, uses modern methods such as the radiogram to teach the pupils. (Photo by Binnie Hales/Fox Photos/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Record players are more portable and easier to use than gramophones. Children also like them.

Advertisement

A man listens to a record in a record booth. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Getty Images

This is a wall that plays records for you. It is similar to the ones that used to exist in Virgin Records across this country. This man is probably not listening to "Love is a Many Spendored Thing," but that is an option.

circa 1955: Two seminarians listening to records in the recreation room at the Claretian Fathers House of Studies in Washington, DC. (Photo by Evans/Three Lions/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Advertisement

Men of the Lord like music too.

circa 1955: Dean Calagno is one of the youngest radio disc jockeys in America and attracts a large teenage audience. Although he has only one show a week, Dean does a great deal of research during the week to be sure which records are exactly right for his playlist. (Photo by Orlando /Three Lions/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Dean Calgano might have been an up-and-coming DJ in 1955, but boy did not know how to store his records.

Advertisement

circa 1955: Sina Maria Walls listening to some classical music in her sitting-room. (Photo by Orlando /Three Lions/Getty Images)
Getty Images

One thing people loved to do in the past: Lie on the floor with their favorite records strewn about them.

26th June 1956: Australian athlete Marlene Mathews, who previously broke the world record for the women's 100 yards with a time of 10.3 seconds, relaxes with her record collection. As well as being 'The Fastest Woman in the World', she is considering a part-time career in fashion modelling. (Photo by Dennis Rowe/BIPs/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Advertisement

See! Lying on the floor is the only way to listen to music. Even if you're the "world's fastest woman."

Portrait of British entertainer Jimmy Wheeler surrounded by his record collection and playing the violin in his home, promoting his new BBC television series, Battersea, circa 1955. (Photo by Chris Ware/Keystone Features/Getty Images)
Getty Images

More lying on floors!

9th September 1957: Teenage girls playing their 78 rpm records. (Photo by M. McKeown/Express/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Advertisement

Yes. Time to lie on the floor again!

Debutante and model Sybilla Edmonstone listening to music on her record player, 15th September 1961. In the mid-sixties, the fashionable nightclub, Sybilla?s, part-owned by George Harrison of The Beatles, was named after her. (Photo by Fred Mott/Evening Standard/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Truly, the only way to listen to music is horizontally.

31st January 1961: Two press ladies enjoy the 'super sofa', designed for easy listening and easy operation of record player controls at the 1961 Furniture Show at Earls Court. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Advertisement

Lie on a couch only if you absolutely must.

29th August 1958: British model Veronica Moon, known as 'Grace Kelly's double' demonstrates the world's smallest record player at the Radio Show in Earls Court, London. The transistor player is made by Kolster-Bandes. (Photo by Ron Case/Keystone/Getty Images)
Getty Images

The only time to sit up with a record is if you are a fancy human with a portable record player.

Advertisement

A woman listening to one of the record players on display at the Earls Court Radio show. (Photo by Evening Standard/Getty Images)
Getty Images

How else would you show how portable the record player is! You don't have to lie down anymore!

circa 1956: Playing the jukebox at 'The Little Soda Fountain' in Manila. (Photo by Evans/Three Lions/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Advertisement

You can stand—if you're going to the jukebox to pick a new stellar hit to play at the soda fountain.

Two teenage boys listening to the latest hits on a pub jukebox. (Photo by Chris Ware/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Definitely stand when you bring your friends over to force them to listen to your favorite tune even though they think pop is for girls, god.

Advertisement

A woman requesting a tune from a jukebox, which features six high-fidelity speakers that creats a quality of stereo sound never before achieved by a jukebox. (Photo by Fox Photos/Getty Images)
Getty Images

This jukebox was very fancy when first invented. You can tell because it had 6 speakers! Marvelous!

1st June 1976: Pupils in the Fourth Form at Holland Park School, a comprehensive school in Holland Park, London, use audio equipment. (Photo by Evening Standard/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Advertisement

Listening to music with friends is probably the best way to listen to music, though. All you need are some headphones, a record player, a reel-to-reel and some friends—be they your schoolmates, the floor, or your absolute favorite parrot.

Kelsey McKinney is a culture staff writer for Fusion.