ABC News

When a babysitter staged a home invasion and lied to police about the burglars, there was one thing she didn't account for: 4-year old Abby Dean.

Abby Dean's 17-year old sitter called 911 to report a burglary in progress, describing two armed black men who forced their way into the Ferndale, Wash. home where she was watching the kids. She then led police to a neighbor, Cory Oaks, who fit the false description.

A SWAT team was called to the scene and Oaks was taken into custody.

"I don't think the babysitter realized the dangerous position it put me in," said neighbor Cody Oaks. "There was a sniper and his spotter just directly pointed at me."

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Luckily for all involved (except perhaps the babysitter and her accomplices), Abby Dean set the record straight with police.

"I did see the burglars come in from the back door," Dean told ABC News.

When she heard the babysitter's account of the crime, she knew something was up.

"It wasn't the right skin color," Dean told ABC.

She told police that the suspects had peach-colored skin, not dark-colored skin. When the sitter was confronted about the discrepancy, she admitted to planning the whole thing with her boyfriend and another accomplice.

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The sitter let two men, including her 16-year-old boyfriend, into the house to steal about $1,500 worth of the family's belongings, including laptops, game system components and a piggy bank, according to a police report.

The names of the sitter and her boyfriend have not been released because they are both under 18. Ruben J. Benjamin, the third accomplice, is 18. All three were arrested and face theft and robbery charges.

"The bad guys stole my kiddie bank. And they stole my iPod. They also stole my Xbox and my Wii," Dean said. "I got it back because of me. Being a superhero."

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Racial Implications

Considering the concern and outrage related to how the criminal justice system deals with race, the implications of the babysitter attempting to blame the black neighbor are frightening.

Here's how one popular commentator, who works under the moniker "Son of Baldwin," put it in a Facebook post, which sparked a larger conversation:

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Oaks was released from custody once the police determined that the sitter's info was false, Sheriff Elfo said.

Alexandra DiPalma is a producer for Fusion Lightworks, Fusion’s In-house Branded Content Agency.