Last summer, Stephen Heasley and Andrew Borg ordered a batch of wedding pamphlets from the internet printing service Vistaprint ahead of their September wedding. However, when their package arrived, Heasley and Borg were horrified to find their order had been replaced with dozens of conservative Christian pamphlets urging them to “understand temptation” and fight against “the supreme tempter [...] Satan.”

Now, the couple has filed a lawsuit against Vistaprint in Massachusetts District Court, alleging the company has “engaged in its own attack on gay marriage,” and that such “morally repugnant” conduct must be “held accountable.”

A representative for Vistaprint has promised an investigation into the incident, saying:

We pride ourselves on being a company that celebrates diversity and enables customers all over the world to customize products for their special events.

We understand how upsetting it would be for anyone to receive materials such as these the night before their wedding and we have immediately launched an internal investigation.

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The couple, who live in Australia but chose to wed in the U.S. for the benefit of their American friends, quickly rushed a second printing of their original pamphlets. However, Heasley told Yahoo, the wedding was conducted under a cloud.

“We realized that whoever had sent this had our personal addresses,” he said. “We were getting married on a family farm in what we understand to be a fairly conservative and rural part of Pennsylvania. If ill-intentioned people decided to target our wedding and guests, we would have very few options to escape or seek shelter.”

In their suit, filed on Tuesday, Heasley and Borg ask to be refunded the initial $79.49 cost of their order, as well as other damages to be determined in trial.

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“Our goal is to hold Vistaprint accountable for the harm they have caused,” the couple told Yahoo. “To give a voice to others who may have been similarly victimized, to help prevent this from happening to someone else, and to send a message that there will be consequences for acts of hate perpetrated against others.”

Vistaprint has declined to comment further on the case until their investigation is completed.