Graphic essay: What the Civil Rights Movement can teach us about surviving Trump

To writer and illustrator Christopher Noxon, the election felt like an apocalyptic nightmare. Yet he managed to find some powerful inspiration on a recent trip.

This image was removed due to legal reasons.
Advertisement
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
Advertisement
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
Advertisement
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
Advertisement
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
Advertisement
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
This image was removed due to legal reasons.
Advertisement

[CORRECTION: In an earlier version, Bayard Rustin was described as an atheist. He was Quaker.]

Christopher Noxon is author of the novel “Plus One” and the nonfiction “Rejuvenile: Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes and the Reinvention of the American Grown-Up.” His writing has appeared in the New Yorker, the Atlantic and Salon. His illustrations have appeared in the Hollywood Reporter, Modern Loss and The Undo List. You can find more at christophernoxon.com

Advertisement

Graphic Culture home | Previous

Follow Graphic Culture: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

Christopher Noxon is author of the novel “Plus One” and the nonfiction “Rejuvenile: Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes and the Reinvention of the American Grown-Up.” His writing has appeared in the New Yorker, the Atlantic and Salon. His illustrations have appeared in the Hollywood Reporter, Modern Loss and The Undo List.

Share This Story

Get our newsletter