As we all know by now, age hardly scares acting grand dame, Helen Lydia Mirren — the soon-to-be septuagenarian beauty works her own as nimbly and alluringly as she does a french fry, which is why when news broke last fall that the 69-year-old stunner was the new face of L'Oreal, we were only surprised it hadn't happened sooner.

Having flouted age conventions with stripper shoes and teeny-weeny Eres bikinis for years now, Mirren was the perfect firebrand to help kickstart L'Oreal's "Age Perfect" line of skincare. Specifically targeting older women as its core audience, Mirren's campaign reportedly speaks to that unique brand of irreverence and IDGAF boldness that comes only with maturity.

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In the newly released first clip from the campaign, you see Mirren embody this spirit effortlessly: after a well-intentioned basic underestimates Mirren by giving up her seat to the acting doyenne at the local bus stop (Mirren does in fact travel via public transportation IRL), Mirren throws the camera some deft side eye.

DEAD.

Yes, Mirren is done with all that, and with a slip of a red bra over her shoulder and a closing of her boudoir door, Mirren re-emerges a moment later, "turning another year bolder" in a moto jacket and black gown, with her lips painted crimson…*I just*

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Mirren confronts the camera head-on, as she is wont to do, showing off her natural countenance, palpable effervescence, and captivating swagger. Age be damned, she's not one to mess with and could quiet easily take your man, if you're not careful.

*CUT TO MIRREN TAKING THAT BUS STOP BASIC'S MAN*

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The clip is less cloying than the offensive and oft-repeated "cougar" trope, though, and is instead more in line with the refreshing new trend of great female icons being tapped to front luxury and beauty lines. Take Joan Didion's recent turn for Céline, Jessica Lange for Marc Jacobs beauty last year, or Tilda Swinton's new spokeswoman appointment for NARS. We seem to be moving past an historical impasse on age, beauty, and femininity that is far too limiting and, quite frankly, dusty.

Watch the whole clip in its entirety below, and BTS footage here.

Marjon Carlos is a style and culture writer for Fusion who boasts a strong turtleneck game and opinions on the subjects of fashion, gender, race, pop culture, and men's footwear.