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Both Republicans and Democrats agree: there's a crisis on the border, with tens of thousands of Central American children making the trek north without a parent or guardian in the past year.

Yet neither party has taken action.

Congress adjourns for its summer break at the end of this week. The Democratic-controlled Senate and Republican-controlled House of Representatives have both put forward legislative proposals, but the fate of either plan remains uncertain.

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We'll be following the debate until recess hits and updating this post with the latest developments.

House passes border, deportation measures

August 1, 9:58 p.m. ET

What they're saying:

The House voted Friday night to pass its revamped border funding bill 223-189.

The $694 million measure contains $35 million to refund states that send their National Guard troops to the border to deal with the influx of children and adults, a move already made by Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R). It also strengthened changes to a 2008 anti-human trafficking law to allow unaccompanied kids from Central America to be deported faster.

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In a separate 216-192 vote, the House passed a bill that would effectively end President Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which allows young undocumented immigrants who have deep ties in the U.S. to obtain a temporary stay of deportation and work permits. Over 553,000 people have benefitted from the program. House Republicans have long opposed the program and have said it has contributed to the recent wave of unaccompanied children crossing the border.

Of note: 11 Republicans, many of whom represent areas with large Hispanic populations, voted against the anti-DACA measure. Four Democrats voted for it.

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What it means:

The House is leaving Washington for the summer having passed a measure that targets President Obama's deportation relief program for young undocumented immigrants. The move will surely please conservative base voters ahead of this fall's midterm elections. But it could further tarnish the Republican Party's image with Latino voters, a group that party leaders have repeatedly said it needs to attract ahead of the next presidential contest.

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That proposal, and the House's emergency border funding measure, won't become law: both have no chance of passing the Democrat-controlled Senate. The upper chamber left town having not passed its own bill, meaning that Congress will go home for five weeks without providing more funds to deal with a situation at the southwest border that members in both parties have called an urgent crisis.

In the short term, Republicans can tell their constituents back home that they acted while Democrats in the Senate stayed idle. But in the process, the Republican "rebranding" effort suffered another self-inflicted wound. Congress has responded to an urgent situation not with a solution, but with dysfunction. Maybe it's a good thing these guys are skipping town for a while.

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Obama blasts Republicans for "extreme and unworkable" legislation

August 1, 3 p.m. ET

What they're saying:

President Obama had lots to talk about on Friday afternoon, including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in Gaza. Still, he found plenty of time to chide House Republicans for trying to pass "extreme and unworkable" immigration legislation "just so they can check a box before they're leaving town for a month."

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Obama said that Republicans failed to deliver an adequate funding bill to deal with a surge of unaccompanied minors crossing the southern border into the U.S., which will force him to reallocate existing resources.

"We're just not going to have the resources we need to fully solve the problem," he said.

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Meanwhile, House Republicans met Friday morning and revised two immigration-related bills. One measure would devote $694 million to the border crisis, and speed up deportations of Central American children; the other aims to take away Obama's power to grant deportation relief to certain individuals. The House is expected to vote on those bills later today, but both pieces of legislation would almost certainly die in the Democrat-controlled Senate.

Obama didn't highlight this in his remarks, but the Senate failed to deliver a spending bill before leaving for the August recess.

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What it means:

Republicans appear to have regrouped on Friday and come up with legislation that their party can agree on. It won't matter much: their internal compromise looks "extreme" to Democrats and won't go anywhere in the Senate, even if it manages to pass the House.

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That means President Obama will need to move around existing funds to deal with processing and housing children and families who have been entering the country from Central America in unprecedented numbers.

Immigration hawks might feel like they've won the battle today, but they may lose the war. The president may need to pare down spending on other aspects of the federal immigration system, like enforcement operations, to pay for the situation on the southern border.

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House Republicans try to hash out a bill

August 1, 11 a.m. ET

What they're saying:

Congress is just hours away from a five-week summer recess but House Republicans are still working.

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A border-funding bill backed by Republican leadership ran aground on Thursday, with immigration hawks threatening to vote against the measure. Leadership pulled the legislation, amid worries it would fail, but told members to stay in town for a possible vote on Friday.

Now they're trying to work out a compromise. The caucus met this morning, reportedly to discuss changes that will allow the U.S. to quickly deport Central American children who enter the country illegally and without a parent or guardian.

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Reports indicate they may have recruited enough votes to enable their bill to pass.

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What it means:

Keep in mind: Democratic members have said they oppose this bill and President Obama threatened to veto it if it reaches his desk (it won't).

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Republicans are mainly trying to figure out if they can stop their infighting and act in response to the border crisis. On Thursday, they failed. Maybe they'll get on the same page today.

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"Senate blocks border bill" via Politico

July 31, 7:53 p.m. ET

What they're saying:

House Republicans drew most of the attention on Thursday with their stalled effort to pass a bill to deal with the influx of Central American migrants across the southern border. But Democrats in the Senate were equally unsuccessful trying to push through their own solution to the border crisis.

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A Democratic measure that would have devoted $2.73 billion to the crisis failed to pass a procedural vote on Thursday evening, Politico reported.

Senators planned to head out of town after final votes, according to Politico, meaning that a bill would not reach the president until after August recess.

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What it means:

House Republicans and Senate Democrats both tried to pass legislation on Thursday to deal with the rise in Central American children crossing into the U.S. Both parties failed, at least thus far (the House could vote on its bill on Friday).

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But the public infighting among Republicans became a story in itself — a party unable to reign in its own membership.

Democrats were no more successful, but kept the drama to a minimum, with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) saying “it’s very regretful that we’re not able to move forward on it.” The bill not only faced opposition from Republicans in the Senate, but also a lack of support from moderate Democrats, Politico reported.

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House Republicans expect a vote on border-funding bill before recess

July 31, 4:10 p.m. ET

What they're saying:

House Republicans will stay in town until they vote on a border-funding bill that would address the rise in Central American migrants entering the country without authorization, members have told reporters.

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House Republican leadership decided not to vote on the bill earlier today, expecting that it would be defeated. Since the House of Representatives is set to begin August recess after this week, some members began to leave town, even making it to the airport. They'll be sticking around at least until tomorrow morning, according to news reports.

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What it means:

Some Republican members were furious at the prospect of leaving town without having voted on a border bill. So leaders appear poised to take another vote so that lawmakers can go home and tell their constituents they acted to address the migrant crisis.

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But the damage may have already been done for House Republicans. The embarrassing way the vote was handled on Thursday showed that GOP leaders don't have a better grasp over their conference than they did before. Dysfunction and internal dissention continues to prevent the body from tackling major issues.

Even if House leaders succeed in wrangling the votes to pass their bill, there's still a very slim chance that the bill will result in a deal with the Senate that can become law and provide the funds needed to deal with the migrant crisis. Ali Noorani, executive director of the National Immigration Forum, summed it up best:

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Lawmakers might not be on vacation yet, but they might as well be.

Reports: Republican aren't giving up on a vote just yet

July 31, 2:45 p.m. ET

What they're saying:

House Republican leadership decided not to allow a vote on their proposal to deal with the influx of Central American migrants along the southern border on Thursday afternoon.

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But while conservative members of the party were declaring victory, party leadership announced a 3 p.m. meeting.

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ABC's Jeff Zeleny connected with House Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers, who apparently wasted some gasoline this afternoon. Rogers told Zeleny that there "should" be an immigration vote this afternoon.

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Several reports on the Hill cited angry Republicans who wanted a vote on immigration.

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Fusion photographed some members leaving the Capitol, presumably ready to begin their August recess. They might not want to shed the suit jackets just yet.

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What it means:

A faction, if not a majority, of Republicans would clearly like to see the border-funding measure pass. It's especially important to those members from border states, where patchwork relief efforts to deal with a rise in children and families crossing the border has strained local volunteer efforts.

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Even if they know this legislation won't become law, they still want to be able to say they tried to find a solution.

House Republicans will not vote on their border funding bill

July 31, 2 p.m. ET

What they're saying:

House Republicans spent a month trying to come up with an answer to the flood of child migrants crossing into the U.S. from Central America, but the legislation they put together fell flat on Thursday.

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Republican leadership decided not to allow a vote on a bill to deal with the border crisis after learning that it would not have enough votes to pass, according to reports. In a statement, top Republican leaders, including Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) placed the responsibility for solving the crisis on President Obama.

"There are numerous steps the president can and should be taking right now, without the need for congressional action, to secure our borders and ensure these children are returned swiftly and safely to their countries," the statement read.

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ABC News Senior Washington Correspondent Jeff Zeleny was one of the first to report the development:

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One of the lead immigration hawks in the House, Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa), told Univision's Lourdes Meluza that conservatives played an influential role in sinking the bill, and that they were prepared to vote against it because they didn’t view the language in the bill as strong enough in regards to immigration enforcement.

What it means:

The legislation had no chance of passage — not only was it opposed by Democrats and President Obama, more conservative Republican members stood against it, too. But it could have been a symbolic gesture to show that Republicans are capable of coming up with legislative solutions.

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Instead, the party's Tea Party faction won out. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) opposed the border funding bill unless it included a vote on legislation to end deportation relief for young people. In the end, leadership might have felt that the bills were sending mixed messages and pulled them since they had no chance of success anyhow.

Still, the move is a costly blunder for House Republican leaders. The bill's collapse doesn't inspire confidence in the House GOP's new leadership team. It's a boon for Democrats. It draws attention away from the Senate, where Democratic leaders are having their own problems cobbling together votes for their border bill. And the inaction gives President Obama and Democrats an issue to hammer Republicans with over the August recess.

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There's an obvious irony here, as well. House Republicans approved a lawsuit against President Obama on Wednesday, accusing him of abusing his executive power. Now they're asking him to handle the border crisis on his own. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's top spokesman was quick to point that out:

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Diaz-Balart won't vote to end deportation relief for young people

July 31, 1:30 p.m.

What they're saying:

Republican leadership in the House of Representatives wants to roll back President Obama's deportation relief program for young people. But at least one Republican won't back their effort.

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"If in fact there's a vote on that, I'll vote against that," Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-Fla.) told Fusion. "Here's the issue. It's not going to pass. It's not going to pass the Senate. So in essence it's going to become more of a messaging item."

Diaz-Balart, who represents a heavily Hispanic district in Florida, said that ending the deportation relief program, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), was not part of the recommendations of the House GOP's border crisis working group.

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"It's more of a messaging issue, more of a procedural issue, so I'm not going to be supporting it," he said.

What it means:

Any chance of finding common ground on a border funding bill before the August recess appears to have slipped away at this point. Diaz-Balart realizes that Republicans are casting a symbolic vote against DACA, and he doesn't want to associate himself with that kind of stance. The Florida congressman favors immigration reform with a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, so this type of measure isn't something you would expect him to back.

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Pelosi: Republicans 'on their own' in border vote, via The Hill

July 31, 11:38 a.m. ET

What they're saying:

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said Thursday that Republicans should not expect help from from Democrats in passing their emergency funding bill in response to the border crisis.

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"Let me put it this way: The Democrats are not going to enable that bill to pass," she said at a press conference. "They [Republicans] are going to have to do that on their own."

What it means:

Facing the prospect of defections from conservative members, Republicans could be forced to pick off Democratic votes to pass their measure. GOP leaders face a tough task in getting their bill across the finish line, and Pelosi is saying she is going to make it even tougher.

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White House lashes out at House Republicans over DACA vote

July 31, 10:33 a.m. ET

What they're saying:

Republicans are planning a vote to take away President Obama's ability to give deportation relief to certain undocumented immigrants. There's no chance that measure will pass, but it still irked White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest. He sent out a statement on Thursday morning:

"It is extraordinary that the House of Representatives, after failing for more than a year to reform our broken immigration reform system, would vote to restrict a law enforcement tool that the Department of Homeland Security uses to focus resources on key enforcement priorities like public safety and border security," he said.

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Earnest pointed out the president's deportation relief program for young people, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), has benefited more that half a million people since its inception in 2012.

In contrast, Earnest said, "the House is instead driving an approach that is about rounding up and deporting 11 million people, separating families, and undermining DHS’ ability to secure the border."

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What it means:

The White House had already said it would veto the Republican funding bill before all the talk about taking away the president's power to offer deportations relief. At this point, there doesn't seem to be any chance of agreement on legislation; it's mainly just a chance for each party to stake out its position in the immigration debate. For the president, that means defending DACA and keeping the door open for a possible expansion of the program in the future.

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"Border battle: House GOP moves to block Barack Obama" via Politico

July 31, 9:15 a.m. ET

What they're saying:

House Republicans plan to vote to restrict President Obama's ability to stop deportations of certain undocumented immigrants, Politico reported Wednesday night.

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The vote would occur Thursday if the Republican's emergency funding package passes the House, according to the paper. The move would target the Obama administration's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA) and pending deportation relief under consideration by the president.

What it means:

Yet again, Republicans are moving to appeal to the conservative base on immigration. Last year, House Republicans took a similar vote to defund the DACA program. The move is largely symbolic—it won't pass the Senate—but it's meant to appease conservatives who have long accused Obama of abusing his executive authority on immigration.

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It's not clear if the maneuver will help Republican leaders attract enough votes to pass their emergency funding measure. But one thing is clear, if the only immigration bills the House votes on this year are about stricter border enforcement and ending deportation relief, that will be another blow for the party's "rebranding" efforts.

White House issues veto threat against House GOP border bill

July 30, 3:40 p.m. ET

What they're saying:

The White House said Thursday it would reccomend that President Obama veto the House Republicans' border bill, calling it "patchwork legislation that will only put more arbitrary and unrealistic demands on an already broken system."

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The $659 million plan is far less than the $3.7 billion Obama requested from Congress to deal with the crisis. The plan calls for changes to a 2008 anti-human trafficking law that are designed to speed up deportations of Central American minors and provides funds to send National Guard troops to the southern border.

Despite the fact that the White House has asked Congress for additional authority to quicken deportations of unaccompanied minors, it said in a statement that the House's plan will "undercut due process for vulnerable children which could result in their removal to life threatening situations in foreign countries."

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What it means:

It's not clear whether the veto threat will change the calculus in the House. The vote was already expected to be close. In fact, if Obama had supported the bill, it might have encouraged more Republicans to vote against the plan in order to deny the president a victory.

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A cadre of House conservatives already opposes the bill out of concern it doesn't go far enough on immigration enforcement. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), an influential conservative, is actively encouraging more members to vote no, according to The Washington Post. No more than a handful of House Democrats are expected to back the proposal when it comes to a vote on Thursday.

Even though the White House has asked for more power to deport unaccompanied minors, it has thrown its support behind Senate Democrats' proposal, which provides $2.73 million to deal with the crisis but does not contain changes to the 2008 law.

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Senate moves forward on border bill

July 30, 11:55 a.m. ET

What they're saying:

The Senate advanced its emergency funding bill to address the wave of Central American children and adults at the southern border.

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The $2.73 billion measure cleared a procedural hurdle by a vote of 63-33 on Wednesday morning. The bill provides money for more detention facilities, border agents, and immigration judges to handle the influx of migrants.

What it means:

That was just the first step for the legislation. Final passage is expected to be a difficult task.

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Senate Republicans could try to amend the legislation to insert changes to a 2008 anti- human trafficking law that would allow unaccompanied minors from Central America to be deported faster, in an attempt to win more conservative votes. Democrats, however, are dead set against any changes to that law. With Congress adjourning for August at the end of the week, the dispute is unlikely to be resolved in such a short period of time.

The Senate's proposal is vastly different from the House's $659 million plan. Even if Senate leaders find the votes to pass their plan, reconciling it with the House's bill when lawmakers return in September could prove to be impossible.

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Former DHS chief Michael Chertoff: Not enough funding in Republican bill

July 30, 10:30 a.m. ET

What they're saying:

Republicans in the House of Representatives have proposed a bill devoting $659 million to deal with the spike in Central Americans flooding over the U.S. border.

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Such funding would only "postpone" the problem, according to Michael Chertoff, who served as secretary of Homeland Security under President George W. Bush. Chertoff spoke at an event hosted by the Bipartisan Policy Center, a non-profit organization based in Washington, D.C.

The Republican plan would allow the federal government to handle the crisis for weeks, but not months, according to Chertoff, who said "you need to give them enough money."

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A funding bill drafted by Senate Democrats would offer significantly more —$2.73 billion.

Chertoff also said that Central Americans crossing the border are "acutely aware of the incentive structure that we've put in place," referring to a 2008 human trafficking law that bars the quick deportation of unaccompanied minors from Central America.

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"If they believe they will come across and be essentially, de facto allowed to stay indefinitely, that's going to encourage more people to come," he said.

What it means:

Chertoff served under President Bush, so this might seem like friendly fire among Republicans. But he's acknowledging the underlying reality: half a billion dollars isn't enough to solve the deeper problems driving tens of thousands of migrants north from Central America.

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Poll: Lots of blame to go around on immigration gridlock via Associated Press

July 30, 10:01 a.m. ET

What they're saying:

From the new Associated Press-GfK poll:

"Americans place more blame on Republicans in Congress (44 percent say they deserve all or a lot of the blame) than on Democrats (36 percent) or President Barack Obama (38 percent) for that lack of legislative action, according to the poll. But those figures aren't mutually exclusive. When combined, the poll reveals that 61 percent place at least some of the blame on both Obama and the Republicans in Congress … Among independents, 72 percent place at least some blame on both sides.

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"Obama's approval rating for handling immigration dipped in the new poll, with just 31 percent approving of his performance on the issue. He took a particularly large hit among Hispanics. Just 29 percent of Hispanics said they approve of the way Obama is handling immigration, down from 42 percent in May."

There's some more bad news for Democrats:

"Only 32 percent of Americans favor emergency funding to speed up the process and improve living conditions for those awaiting a hearing now, a proposal anchoring the solution the Obama administration is pressing. Far more, 51 percent, say they favor a proposal similar to one offered by some Republicans. Those Republicans have advocated a change in U.S. law so that all unaccompanied children arriving in the country can be sent back to their home countries by border patrol agents without going through a deportation hearing — matching the treatment children from Mexico and Canada currently receive."

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What it means:

The issue could play a role in this fall's midterm elections, given that the problem could persist for months. Almost half of those who say they are highly likely to cast a ballot are following the crisis closely. It's not clear, however, which party will receive the most punishment, since similar percentages blame President Obama and the GOP for the government's inability to address immigration reforms.

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"Cruz urges rejection of border bill" via Politico

July 29, 5:06 p.m. ET

What they're saying

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) is rejecting the House Republican proposal to deal with the border crisis, saying that it should have included a provision to specifically stop the expansion of President Obama's deportation relief program. The Obama administration is reportedly considering widening the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program to include millions of undocumented immigrants already living in the U.S.

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What it means

Cruz is influential with a cadre of House conservatives and his opposition to House GOP plan underscores the difficulty leaders could face in finding enough votes to pass the bill.

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Boehner accuses Reid of trying to "derail" border bill

July 29, 3:34 p.m. ET

What they're saying

House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) issued the following statement after Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said he would try to attach a comprehensive immigration reform proposal to the House's border spending bill:

“Senator Reid, embarrassed that he cannot strong-arm the Senate into passing the blank check President Obama demanded, is making a deceitful and cynical attempt to derail the House’s common-sense solution. So let me be as clear as I can be with Senator Reid: the House of Representatives will not take up the Senate immigration reform bill or accept it back from the Senate in any fashion."

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What it means

Reid's statement will delight immigrant-rights activists, who have said the border crisis could have been prevented if Congress passed an immigration reform bill last year. But Boehner is signaling to Reid that his threat won't make him back down from moving forward with the Republicans' border plan. At the same time, Reid's comments could fuel the fears of immigration hawks, who are worried that the crisis-response effort could be used to offer legal status to millions of undocumented immigrants.

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"Reid: GOP border bill could be vehicle for immigration reform" via The Hill

July 29, 2:55 p.m. ET

What they're saying:

Reid said that if House Republicans manage to pass a border-funding bill, Senate Democrats could respond by attempting to combine it with the massive comprehensive immigration reform bill that passed in the Senate a year ago.

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What it means:

This is every immigration hardliner's nightmare: pass a bill meant to beef up border security, only to have the pro-immigration reform camp twist it around to provide a legalization program for undocumented immigrants. That's farfetched, though. More likely: Senate Democrats want to present Republicans with the choice of accepting broad immigration reform or walking away empty-handed.

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"House GOP cuts border funding bill" via Politico

July 29, 12:29 p.m. ET

What they're saying:

Republicans have drafted a bill to deal with the flood of Central American migrants. The legislation offers $659 million to handle the crisis—far less than the $3.7 billion originally requested by the Obama administration—and would allow the U.S. to deport children faster.

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What it means:

At the least, Republicans will be able to head back to their home districts saying their party came up with a proposal to deal with the immigration crisis. That could be useful for GOP members facing re-election battles in border states like Texas and Arizona, where the crisis is most acutely felt. Lawmakers in districts with large Central American communities could also face pressure to act.

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Jordan Fabian is Fusion's politics editor, writing about campaigns, Congress, immigration, and more. When he's not working, you can find him at the ice rink or at home with his wife, Melissa.

Ted Hesson was formerly the immigration editor at Fusion, covering the issue from Washington, D.C. He also writes about drug laws and (occasionally) baseball. On the side: guitars, urban biking, and fiction.