AP

Gen. John Kelly, President Trump’s current chief of staff and onetime media hopeful to steer the sinking ship that is the White House, continues to suck. On Monday, he reminded the world just how much he sucks when he declined an opportunity to apologize to Rep. Frederica Wilson, whom he lied about in an attempt to discredit her.

Defending Trump’s astoundingly insensitive phone call to the widow of a fallen Green Beret, Kelly accused Wilson of politicizing his death during a press conference less than two weeks ago. Wilson backed up the widow’s account of her conversation with Trump. “He knew what he signed up for,” Trump reportedly told Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Sgt. LaDavid Johnson.

During the press conference, Kelly falsely claimed Wilson had taken credit for securing the funding of an FBI building in her Florida district, but archival footage of the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the building proved otherwise. The White House predictably stood by Kelly’s accusations.

On Monday night, Fox News Host Laura Ingraham asked Kelly if he felt like he needed to apologize to Wilson, to which he responded with a resounding refusal. “Oh no,” he replied. “No. Never. Well, I’ll apologize if I need to, but not for something like that. Absolutely not. I stand by comments.”

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Kelly also declined to apologize to Johnson. “She has the right to say what she wants to say,” Kelly told Ingraham. “But it’s the politicization of something that was so from the heart.”

If there remained a morsel of confusion about Kelly’s allegedly rational guidance in an administration led by an impulsive toddler, please refer to the comments he made regarding Confederate monuments. Removing the statues, Kelly said, demonstrates “a lack of appreciation of history and what history is.”

Though that was probably the least offensive observation Kelly made about the Confederacy during his interview with Ingraham. The Civil War, Kelly claimed, started because of an inability to “compromise.” Compromise? Oh yes, if only the Confederacy and the Union could have worked out a compromise...to avoid the abolition of slavery?

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“Men and women of good faith on both sides made their stand where their conscience had them make their stand,” he added. “Robert E. Lee was an honorable man who gave up his country to fight for his state.”

Ah, “both sides,” now where have I heard that before?