The international Venezuelan community has been paying close attention to the anti-government protests that have been sweeping the nation over the last few weeks, during which at least ten people have died. Today rallies were held across the world in solidarity with the protesters in Venezuela. Hashtags #SOSVenezuela and #PrayForVenezuela were used to spread the word.

Since President Hugo Chavez started instituting his version of Latin American socialism in 1999, hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans, many of them well-to-do, fled the country, settling all over the world. The protests on Saturday were largely held in cities that have become home to this Venezuelan diaspora.

South Florida, home to approximately 100,000 Venezuela natives, is the epicenter of this ex-pat community. Today, protesters gathered across the region in support of the opposition.

Players from the Miami Marlins joined in calls for peace. The Sun Sentinel reports that violence in the country has prompted pitcher Henderson Alvarez to send for his wife and daughter ahead of schedule. Tear gas fired near the family’s Caracas home has given the couple’s two month old infant respiratory problems.

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Miami Police also joined in.

La policía de Miami apoya a Venezuela. pic.twitter.com/hubJgO4mL6— #PrayForVenezuela (@heyEmi_) February 22, 2014

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In New York City, hundreds of opposition supporters gathered at Union Square.

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There were also rallies held in Houston, which like Miami, has a large Venezuelan population.

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Members of the New Orleans Venezuelan and Cuban communities have held a joint rally. Cuba’s Castro regime and the Venezuelan government have worked closely in both the Chavez and Maduro administrations. In exchange for oil, Cuba supplies the country with doctors, military training, and strategic political planning.

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In Washington D.C. protesters gather at between the Washington Monument and at Rawlins Park.

In Madrid a sign reads: “The government has the bullets, but you have the balls."

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Crowds are even gathered in Dublin, Ireland.

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But all of this pales in comparison with the huge crowds seen on in Caracas, and across Venezuela.

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Nevertheless, Venezuela remains a divided country. Simultaneous protests in support of the Maduro administration, and a legacy of ‘Chavismo’ also filled the streets on Saturday.

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Daniel Rivero is a producer/reporter for Fusion who focuses on police and justice issues. He also skateboards, does a bunch of arts related things on his off time, and likes Cuban coffee.