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By now, it's safe to assume you have heard of Rachel Dolezal, a Washington civil rights leader who allegedly spent years of her life disguising herself as black, and whose parents now say she is Caucasian.

But Dolezal wasn't just an activist, professor, and president of the Spokane chapter of the NAACP. She was also an artist.

Dolezal's art was her ticket to a full scholarship at Howard University, an historically black school where she received her MFA. In 2002, she presented her work during an exhibition with the school, which the Washington Post described as featuring a "group of emerging black artists" who were dealing with "identity issues" and the "burden of identity" through the works.

The name of the piece Dolezal presented (under her married name Rachel Moore) was "Hypocrisy: A Form of Godliness."

On her art blog, which dates back to 2007, you can see more of Dolezal's art — much of which deals with black subjects, and issues of race and ethnicity. She also created art about her family, in which she appeared to portray herself as black. This piece's caption, for example, reads: "Featuring the artist's younger sister while living in South Africa."

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You can check out more of Dolezal's works here.

Daniel Rivero is a producer/reporter for Fusion who focuses on police and justice issues. He also skateboards, does a bunch of arts related things on his off time, and likes Cuban coffee.