Andy Dubbin/Fusion

Hold on to your hats, folks. Republicans are taking full control of Congress today—for the first time since 2006. And they’re looking to make good on their campaign promises.

That means more fighting about Obama’s recent executive actions (like on immigration and Cuba), except one side has gained some serious leverage. And now that they’re in charge, Republicans will also go to bat again for some older favorites, like the Keystone XL pipeline that environmentalists can’t stand.

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The GOP doesn't have the two-thirds majority it would need to override a veto from President Obama, so things probably won’t get too crazy. Still, the next two years will be a big test for both Republicans' ability to lead and their increasingly fragmented party.

Here are nine areas we can expect to see movement in.

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THE OIL PIPELINE GETS ANOTHER PUSH. Approving the Keystone XL Pipeline will likely be one of Mitch McConnell’s first pushes as leader of the Senate Republicans. The pipeline has been a hot issue for years, with Democrats and Republicans bickering over its construction while the Obama administration has conducted a lengthy and delayed review of its potential environmental effects.

Democrats’ strategy is basically to hope for a presidential veto if Republicans pass the legislation — something that is likely, since the bill was only narrowly defeated in the lame-duck session of Congress when Democrats were still in control.

“Understand what this project is," Obama said at a Nov. 14 press conference in Burma. "It is providing the ability of Canada to pump their oil, send it through our land, down to the Gulf, where it will be sold everywhere else. That doesn't have an impact on U.S. gas prices."

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What’ll happen: More of the same — but Republicans will force Obama into making a choice. If Obama does veto, Republicans would need 67 votes to override it and pass the bill into law, thereby clearing the way for construction of the pipeline. That’s not likely, considering they would need 13 Democratic votes in addition to their 54.

—Brett LoGiurato

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OH GREAT, MORE OBAMACARE DEBATE: McConnell has also said he'd like to roll back the Affordable Care Act—a popular idea among Republican voters. He and many of his Republican colleagues would ultimately like to repeal the entire law, but that will never happen while Obama is wielding a veto pen in the White House. Instead, the House is expected to consider a narrower measure that would change the law's definition of "full-time" from people who work 30 hours a week to those who work 40 hours. That would let employers move more workers to part-time status, which would allow companies to avoid buying insurance for these workers without paying a fine.

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What’ll happen: Obamacare isn’t going anywhere. The president will almost certainly veto major changes to his health-care legislation, and Republicans don't have the two-thirds majority they would need to override him. Instead, Republicans may try to squeeze through smaller changes to the law, like the “full-time” distinction, which are more likely to pick up the votes needed to overcome a potential veto.

—Emily DeRuy

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THE WAR ON TERROR’S UP FOR A VOTE: President Obama has asked Congress to pass a new authorization to use military force against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, better known as ISIS. McConnell, the new Senate leader, has already said the Senate would pass such a measure early this year. But other Republicans want Obama to adopt a broader, more forceful strategy to combat the Islamic State, which could set up a confrontation with Obama and Democrats.

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Best Bet: Obama gets a new authorization for military force with votes from both parties and the War on Terror continues.

—-Jordan Fabian

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BACKLASH TO THE CUBA DEAL: President Obama's move to normalize relations with Cuba angered top Republicans, who could attempt to stop the president's plan. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida) last month vowed to block the confirmation of anyone who may be appointed as U.S. ambassador to Cuba. Rubio, who’s now chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee's Western Hemisphere subpanel, also said he would attempt to cut off funds for a U.S. embassy in Cuba as well as other money to implement the program.

Best bet: Obama is able to go ahead with most policy changes on Cuba, but Congress blocks money for a new embassy in Havana and the Senate is unwilling to confirm an ambassador.

—-Jordan Fabian

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…AND BACKLASH TO THE IMMIGRATION DEAL: Republicans were infuriated when Obama rolled out a program in November to provide deportation relief to an estimated 5 million people, and they'll almost certainly resume the fight now that they're in the majority.

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Before the December recess, the House passed a symbolic bill (i.e. sure to fail) that aimed to take away the president's power to grant deportation relief and essentially kill the program before it started. The measure was defeated in the Senate, but you can expect them to try similar legislation again.

The bigger threat to the deportation relief program centers around funding for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which runs out in February. Republicans could attempt to hold the funding hostage to block the deportation relief program.

If they did that, things could get messy, since DHS oversees border and airport security, among other vital services. But the deportation relief program would likely survive. The agency that will administer the program, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is almost entirely fee-funded, so it's not dependent on funding from Congress.

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Worst-case scenario: The threat of a DHS shutdown forces Obama to scale back his deportation relief program.

—Ted Hesson

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ILLEGALIZE IT? Medical pot got a huge boost when language included in a end-of-the-year spending bill prohibited the government from using federal funds to go after medical marijuana businesses. That's a historic first in the marijuana world — and Republicans let it happen.

The spending bill, however, also included a Republican-backed measure that attempts to block marijuana legalization in the District of Columbia from taking effect. (D.C. voters passed legalization in November, but the city is subject to unique oversight by Congress.)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser plans to fight for legalization, but the move shows Republicans are willing to use their power to stop marijuana legalization from spreading. That said, they don't hold the same power over the states as they do over D.C., so blocking marijuana elsewhere would be more challenging.

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Worse-case scenario: D.C. officials postpone marijuana legalization because they're afraid to lose federal funding.

—Ted Hesson

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NET NEUTRALITY COULD BE ON THE LINE. The fight for an open internet is not over—Republicans are already exploring ways to undermine possible new regulations on Internet service providers.

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Though the specifics haven't yet been disclosed, it's becoming increasingly likely that upcoming proposed rules from the FCC will be much stricter than anticipated. It wouldn't be that surprising if the plan called for treating Internet service as a utility, something net neutrality activists and President Obama have called for. That’d be a win for net-neutrality advocates, who say that more FCC oversight is the best way to ensure that everyone has equal access to the Internet.

Republicans have a few ways to get around such rules. These include cutting the FCC's budget, updating the Telecommunications Act of 1996 that would include a provision on how the Internet is regulated, or even passing a bill that would negate whatever decision the FCC reaches.

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Worst-case scenario: Honestly, none of this might matter. In all likelihood, the ISPs will be challenging the FCC's rules—whatever they may be—in court. In the words of Michael Powell, a former FCC chairman who now runs the pro-ISP lobbying group National Cable and Telecommunications Association, this legal dispute "probably will go longer than the Obama administration."

—Fidel Martinez

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TRADE DEALS: SURPRISINGLY INTERESTING. Here’s one place where a GOP-led Senate could actually help Obama out.

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Obama needs Congress to pass a special authority for him to fast-track certain trade deals that Congress can either accept or reject but cannot change.

Harry Reid, now the former Majority Leader, wouldn’t allow a vote on fast-track legislation. (Democrats generally fear expanded trade could cost American jobs and have a negative effect on global wages.) But Obama has been pushing hard for a pair of trade agreements with the EU and nations in Asia, saying they will create millions of jobs through a vast expansion of U.S. exports.

Now some Republicans appear to agree. Republican aides told Fusion recently they are open to working with Obama to get fast-track legislation.

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"Trade is an issue that Democrats see as tough medicine," a senior GOP Finance Committee aide said. "They know we need it. They know it's good in the long run. It's just hard to swallow.”

"It's an issue that splits Democrats much more than it splits Republicans,” he said.

What’ll happen: By all indications, Obama is planning to move forward on this item of his agenda, even if it means forging an alliance with Republicans. But it could anger many members of his own party and even become a thorny issue for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, if she chooses to run.

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—Brett LoGiurato

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REMEMBER THE DEBT CEILING? Here we go again. Congress will have to vote to extend the nation's borrowing authority sometime this spring or summer.

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Rep. Tom Price (Georgia), the next House Budget Committee chairman, told Dow Jones last month the GOP could demand major spending cuts in exchange for raising the debt ceiling.

If the GOP pursues this strategy, it could lead to a repeat of the 2013 debt ceiling fight, when Republicans demanded cuts to federal programs before they would allow the government to borrow more money. And if Republicans and Democrats don't come to an agreement to raise the debt ceiling, the government may not have enough money to pay its bills. That could affect Social Security payments and military salaries, among other programs.

Worst-case scenario: Another debt-limit fight that puts financial markets on edge and has everyone else asking, "wait, what's the debt ceiling?"

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—Jordan Fabian

@fusion