Michael Tran

Last night, CBS aired the 57th Annual Grammy Awards, a massive school recital for adult multimillionaires. As the ceremony edged perilously close to the four-hour mark, Music’s Biggest Night effectively became Music's Sleepiest Night. (The Album of the Year is traditionally awarded Hands on a Hardbody style, with the honor going to whichever musical artist can stay awake the longest.)

That's why, when we first saw the hashtag #GRAMMMYs pop up in our Twitter feeds, we assumed our thoroughly fried brains had gotten the best of us. But then we saw it again. And again. And again.

Yes, #GRAMMMYs is real, and no, that's not how you spell #GRAMMYs. According to the Twitter index Topsy, the misspelled hashtag appeared in more than 106,000 tweets in the last 24 hours (as of 10:30 a.m today). That's admittedly far fewer than the 2.6 million tweets containing the correct #GRAMMYs hashtag over the same period, but still—six figures is hardly insignificant.

Was this a bit? A poorly conceived promotional tactic? An Illuminati signal? A nod to the fact that Rihanna's cupcake dress looked, mmm, delicious? (No, no, maybe, and yes, but that's not the point.) As far as we can tell, this typo was simply a casualty of frenetic live-tweeting war, compounded by the fact that the triple-M is actually sort of aesthetically pleasing. It doesn't immediately strike the reader as incorrect, unlike, say, #GRRAMMYS or #GRAMYS.

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But the Internet proletariat isn't solely to be blame for this trend. Some big-name brands got in on the #GRAMMMYs action, too.

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We're happy to report that CBS managed to spell the name of their own damn ceremony correctly, though they did retweet #GRAMMMYs tweets from The Talk cohost Julie Chen and Jane the Virgin star (and Grammys presenter) Gina Rodriguez.

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We'll see you at the Oscurs.

Molly Fitzpatrick is senior editor of Fusion's Pop & Culture section. Her interests include movies about movies, TV shows about TV shows, and movies about TV shows, but not so much TV shows about movies.