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This piece has been updated to reflect numbers of Native American delegates

The Democratic National Convention is mimicking last week’s Republican National Convention in certain ways. Like the schedule: speech, speech, speech, performance, speech speech. And also the sartorial choices of convention goers: weird hats, signs, American flag paraphernalia. But that’s about as far similarities go. From the first night, it was already clear that the attendees and speakers at the DNC’s inaugural night looked a whole lot different than the ones at the RNC.

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On Monday alone, America encountered disability rights advocate Anastasia Samosa, ninth generation Mexican-American actress Eva Longoria, and undocumented immigrant and DREAMer Astrid Silva. (And those women weren’t even the evening’s headliners.) Cameras panning across the convention hall showed not just one or two black and Latino faces in a sea of white ones, like at the RNC, but a crowd that looks a lot more like America does: diverse. Essentially, we’re being given two distinct version of America: last week we saw its past, and this week we’re seeing its future.

The numbers don't lie either.

Hillary Clinton’s campaign told Fusion that 2,887 of this year's 4,766 DNC delegates are women. Black men and women account for 1,182 delegates (compared to 18 at the RNC) while 292 are Asian American, 747 are Latinos, 147 Native Americans, and 633 are LGBTQ-identified people.

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Thirty women stepped up to the podium Monday night at the DNC.

Michelle Obama
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Michelle Obama
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…and 30 men, making last night an even split between men and women.

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 25:  Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) delivers remarks on the first day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 25, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
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Eighteen of the 30 women who spoke were women of color.

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 25:  Actress Eva Longoria waves to the crowd after delivering remarks on the first day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 25, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Actress Eva Longoria
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…and at least two of the 30 women identify as lesbians. One of those two is a preacher and veteran, Nevada State Sen. Pat Spearman.

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 25: Sen. Pat Spearman (D-NV) delivers remarks on the first day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 25, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
Sen. Pat Spearman (D-NV)
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Aaaand here’s what the RNC looked like…

CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 21:  Attendees listen to Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump deliver his speech on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicked off on July 18.  (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
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The first night at the RNC only featured seven women, and as Quartz points out, five of those seven spoke before prime time. (Sen. Joni Ernest was bumped to a late-night slot.)

And let’s not forget the most memorable speech given by a woman at the RNC on opening night. (Although, to be fair, a famous black woman was also represented…)

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CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18:  Melania Trump, wife of Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, waves to the crowd after delivering a speech on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Melania Trump
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So, for all you math nerds, the DNC had 23 more women speakers the first night of the DNC than the first night of the RNC.

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And guess what else? This year’s DNC has at least 27 trans delegates, reports Mic.

Then there’s the question of race. The DNC looked like a scene straight out of a certain popular ‘90s multicultural PBS show. Already we know that the majority of women who graced the stage last night were women of color. But here’s the breakdown of race across gender:

There were 18 black speakers last night. (Coincidentally, that’s exactly as many black delegates at the RNC—total.)

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PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 25:  Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) gestures while delivering remarks on the first day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 25, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ)
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Twelve of Monday night’s speakers were Latino.

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 25: Astrid Silva delivers remarks on the first day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 25, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
DREAMer Astrid Silva
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Twenty-nine white speakers got airtime at the podium, which means, friends, there were more women who spoke last night than white people who spoke in total. Wowee!

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 25:  Comedian/actress Sarah Silverman speaks as Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) looks on during the first day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 25, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) and comedian Sarah Silverman
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According to Politico, more than 80% of the 71 prime time speakers at the RNC were white.

CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 21:  Attendees listen to Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump deliver his speech on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicked off on July 18.  (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
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There’s nothing that captures the ideological differences between the Republican and Democratic parties like their respective conventions. The GOP struggles mightily to attract voters of color, and the 2016 primary election was viewed as a referendum on whether or not the party would shift with America’s demographics. Clearly, it did not. Instead, it doubled down.

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The party’s pick, Donald Trump—whose policies target immigrants and Muslims—is a reaction against inclusivity.

ROANOKE, VA - JULY 25:  Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump address an audience at the The Hotel Roanoke & Conference Center on July 25, 2016 in Roanoke, Virginia. Trump is campaigning with a bump in the polls following the Republican National Convention where he accepted the party's nomination.  (Photo by Sara D. Davis/Getty Images)
Donald Trump
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If Monday night is any indication, the Democratic party stands in stark opposition to the GOP’s message. Which, let me remind you once again, is this:

CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 21:  Attendees listen to Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump deliver his speech on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicked off on July 18.  (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
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Caitlin Cruz contributed reporting to this piece.

Collier Meyerson is a reporter at Fusion with a focus on race and politics. She lives in Brooklyn.

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