Virtual reality gaming consoles like the Oculus Rift have promised that the games of the future will be immersive, multisensory experiences that draw players into games in amazing ways. Imagine being able to build a world around yourself, explore ancient ruins, or fly around a city as a seagull whilst uncontrollably covering everything below yourself in bird poop.

Elijah O'Rear

In Elijah O’Rear’s Sploot, you can do just that. The first-person bird flight simulator puts the player into the sky from the perspective of a seagull whose only goals in life are to eat as much bread as possible and to quickly expel the digested food onto buildings, cars, and people. The more luxurious the thing you poop on, the more points you gain. The game is as simple as it is strangely satisfying.

Though O'Rear developed the game with the Oculus Rift in mind, Sploot is available to download (for free!) for both Windows PCs and Mac OSX. The controls are straightforward and meant to be picked up nearly instantaneously. Flight is controlled via the the mouse with a secondary view displaying the "fecal chaos" you're wreaking on the unsuspecting citizens below.

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Elijah O'Rear
Elijah ORear

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According to O'Rear, he's got no personal beef with seagulls and grew up thinking of them as exotic seabirds that rarely made it to his landlocked childhood home. He says he was inspired to design Sploot after hearing about Birdly, another virtual reality game, that was demoed at this year's Sundance film festival.

"My immediate thought was'"Yeah, but what if the bird pooped?' I couldn't get that idea out of my head," O'Rear told Fusion. "Originally, you were going to make farting noises into a mic to make the seagull poop, but the game was more fun with constant pooping."

Ultimately, O'Rear wants people to experience the kind of whole body experience that games like Sploot can create while still featuring abstract controls that pull people out of their typical frame of reference for bodily movement.

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"So unlike Birdly, which tries to give you a 1-1 mapping between your body and a bird's motion of flight, Sploot uses an abstract concept of flight," the game developer told Fusion. "You just turn your head, but it still feels satisfying."

Though Sploot may not initially seem like the most  palatable game to spend your time playing, rest assured that it's a fantastic way to work through your crippling case of the Mondays.