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There's something about the Nazi gold saga you have to know: There might not be any Nazi gold. I know, I know. Take a minute. OK.

But yeah, anyway: there's maybe no Nazi gold. Last time we checked in, a Polish official said there was a "99% chance" of the Nazi gold existing, but guess what? Nothing since then. And that was more than a month ago. Now, there's Polish military personnel trawling the presumed premises of the Nazi gold, but so far: no Nazi gold.

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So, maybe there's no Nazi gold, but that doesn't mean there isn't gold flowing into the town where people think there is Nazi gold. Just a little something called "hype"—ever heard of it?

NBC News reports the town of Walbrzych, Poland (site of presumed Nazi gold) is just RAKING IN the tourism cash from folks enamored with the Nazi gold tale, or perhaps trying to snag some Nazi gold for themselves:

"Loch Ness is famous for a monster never found. This is like our Loch Ness monster," local historian Mateusz Mykytyszyn, 36, told NBC News. "We have been hoping to become a tourist town since the mines closed in the 1990s and it happened over one month because of the train story."

He added: "I've spoken with restaurant owners, taxi drivers, tour operators and they have seen a huge rise in interest. Definitely it is a different town."

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So which is it? Aspiring treasure hunters, or just some bored tourists? Let's meet some Nazi gold fans:

Among the tourists drawn to the area Tuesday by the possible treasure were British visitor Paul Winslet, 50, and his Polish partner, Emilia. They came to see the city's Książ Castle, which has its own underground tunnels that were made during the Nazi occupation.

"I've seen images of the castle for years and then we saw all the news about the gold train in the British press," he said. "Emilia said it's not far from her home town so we decided to come have a look."

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"Yeah, we were just bored, checking it out, no big deal." Yeah, right! They're Nazi gold treasure hunters.

Give it up, Paul and Emilia: there's probably no Nazi gold. Life is a ceaseless ferris wheel of crushed dreams.

Michael Rosen is a reporter for Fusion based out of Oakland.