AP

The fallout from President Donald Trump’s spree of Islamophobic (and, in one case, likely false) retweets from a far-right British extremist group has escalated into a full-blown row between the United States and the United Kingdom.

On Thursday, British Prime Minister Theresa May condemned the tweets in what was, for her, a very rare public rebuke of Trump.

“The fact that we work together does not mean that we’re afraid to say when we think the United States has got it wrong, and be very clear with them,” May said during a press conference. “And I‘m very clear that retweeting from Britain First was the wrong thing to do.”

May’s message was delivered as the UK’s Ambassador to the United States reportedly met with a number of senior White House officials to mend the situation.

True to form, Trump wasted no time making an already bad situation worse, responding to May’s message by publicly demanding that she essentially mind her own business.

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Early Thursday morning, London Mayor Sadiq Khan—a longtime Trump antagonist—called for May to rescind the UK’s formal invitation to the president for a state visit, explaining that “any official visit from President Trump to Britain would not be welcomed.”

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When asked about any upcoming state visit on Thursday, May said simply, “we have yet to set a date.”

The row even managed to draw in the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby.

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So, within 24 hours, Trump managed to unify a conservative prime minister, a liberal London mayor, and the head of the Church of England. And the week’s not over yet.