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President Trump “denounced” white nationalists because his feeble ego couldn’t endure the public pummeling he received for his initial response to Charlottesville’s domestic terrorist attack. His “condemnation” would have been more sincere if it were delivered by an actual robot.

Trump thought, or so it seems from a expectedly boorish tweet he sent a few hours after “condemning” white nationalists on Monday afternoon, that the media would praise him for correctly identifying white nationalists — for being “presidential.”

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Despite his successful charming of the media with stunts like applauding the widow of a fallen Navy SEAL and launching a strike on Syria, pundits didn’t take the bait this time.

The white supremacists who Trump supposedly condemned didn’t even buy his “condemnation.” Richard Spencer, a Neo-nazi who wears a suit, told reporters that he thought Trump’s remarks were “so hollow” and insincere. “I don’t think Donald Trump is a dumb person,” Spencer said on Monday. “And only a dumb person would take those lines seriously.”

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And like a pavlovian dog who wasn’t rewarded, Trump lashed out and negated whatever minuscule iota of decency his “condemnation” provided Saturday’s victims — Heather Heyer, who died, and the 19 other people who were injured.

Ultimately, Trump’s tweet confirms what we already knew: his decision to “condemn” white nationalists was, without a doubt, a ploy to appease his critics. It was a PR stunt. If he truly cared about denouncing white nationalism (he doesn’t) then his condemnation wouldn’t have taken two days, he would have delivered his “remarks” in Charlottesville, VA, and Steve Bannon wouldn’t have a job in the White House.